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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So my buddies all have Rugged radios but honestly they seem awfully expensive. I have been looking at PCI as well but again expensive for something I ride 12-18 times a year so…

The other thing I find crazy is how cumbersome they seem. Wires everywhere etc.

So my question is what options to do I have for Bluetooth communication between my passenger and even to the radio. I read in another thread someone using a Midland radio and Sena Headsets. So I started research but honestly could not make heads or tails of it. I found some Sena that will allow intercom and music and phone but how to connect those to a radio? I can’t figure it out. I’d love any input I could get.

I am also thinking of a Boafeng handheld programming it.

Anyways I appreciate your help.
Cheers Bo
 

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You ride once a month or more....it's worth it. He'll we ride maybe 8 tines a year and justified a pci unit (which is superior to the rugged in every way).
As for cumbersome, a good install goes a long way. Nothing exposed except the mics for the helmets.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
If I’m being honest. Once a month in the winter for sure but yeah it’s still a ton of money. Two kids in college and another one soon.
You ride once a month or more....it's worth it. He'll we ride maybe 8 tines a year and justified a pci unit (which is superior to the rugged in every way).
As for cumbersome, a good install goes a long way. Nothing exposed except the mics for the helmets.
I may be overstating my riding. I’m in AZ so maybe once a month in the winter. 😀. Still it seems silly that these are not Bluetooth compatible to get rid of the wires.
 

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If I’m being honest. Once a month in the winter for sure but yeah it’s still a ton of money. Two kids in college and another one soon.


I may be overstating my riding. I’m in AZ so maybe once a month in the winter. 😀. Still it seems silly that these are not Bluetooth compatible to get rid of the wires.
you can get bluetooth set ups for the helmets like the Senna but theyll only work with other bluetooth users and cell at least to my knowledge. the PCI and Rugged all use GMRS (i believe they both have new frequency options) which makes them able to communicate with each other (which is the biggest pro of GMRS) so anyone with a handheld can tune into the same frequency and communicate.

GMRS also works where cell service is non existent. PCI dealer here so let me know if you need any help deciding if thats the route you want to go. i ran it in my YXZ and my only complaint was that i didnt do it sooner. the $ hurts, but only for a little. has saved me and my group from many accidents and getting lost on trails.
 

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I have the Cardo Packtalk. I have quads and a YXZ and don't get to ride either that much and did not want to spend a lot of money on a 2 way radio to talk to my passenger. With the Cardo system I have the speakers and mic installed in my wife and my helmet (for riding the quads) and we have the headphone set that we use when we ride in the YXZ. The little unit pops in and out of the little cradle so you can move the unit back and forth. Kind of hard to explain how the whole system works, however you might want to look into the Cardo with the headphone option.
 

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I started out with bluetooth and after one year threw it all away and went with a Rugged 5050 intercom.

A year later I added a GMRS 25 watt radio.

When friends joined us, they went with Sena bluetooth intercoms. After their first year they chucked the whole setup and also went with a Rugged 5050 and a GMRS 25 watt radio.

Why? The easy answer is "Simplicity".

"Sit down and plug in. Unplug and get out".

There are no batteries to charge, there is nothing to "pair", there is no interference. Want to adjust the volume? Its right there in front you, just twist the knob. Want to hear the weather? Twist the knob. Want to hit someone 200 miles away? Twist the knob and hit the repeater to hit whomever you need. Oh, get the FCC license you need first.

I won't comment on the difference between PCI and Rugged. I chose Rugged mostly due to availability and range of accessories. After the purchase I did find that I had paid an additional $100 for a TY-8600 radio. The additional cost can be thought of as the additional support and programming. The programming I blew away immediately and replaced with my own. This gave me access to channels and features that aren't available in many stock radios. Things like pre-programmed Weather Radio channels, or access to repeaters.

As for a clean install. I mounted mine in the cage, it did cost a bit more for the tube clamps ($60?). But it put everything out of the way, and put it where you could easily reach any controls. Best of all, the mud rarely gets that high... Rarely, but not always.
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As for advice in an intercom, the only "advice" I would have is to avoid a VOX system. The reason I say that is again, simplicity.

I've been using intercoms and radios and intercoms professionally since I was 18, so 40 years between flying, flying for the Army and being a tank commander.

A VOX system has a built in delay when you you start speaking. So you either learn to start everything with a "leader" so that the VOX system is activated by the time you start speaking, or you lose the first part of the message. It gets really annoying.

I chose the Rugged Radios 5050 for the reason that its a constant on intercom, no activation lag.

All told I probably put $1k into intercoms and radios. At least $250 of that ended up in the trash at the end of the day.

Thanks
Nate
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I started out with bluetooth and after one year threw it all away and went with a Rugged 5050 intercom.

A year later I added a GMRS 25 watt radio.

When friends joined us, they went with Sena bluetooth intercoms. After their first year they chucked the whole setup and also went with a Rugged 5050 and a GMRS 25 watt radio.

Why? The easy answer is "Simplicity".

"Sit down and plug in. Unplug and get out".

There are no batteries to charge, there is nothing to "pair", there is no interference. Want to adjust the volume? Its right there in front you, just twist the knob. Want to hear the weather? Twist the knob. Want to hit someone 200 miles away? Twist the knob and hit the repeater to hit whomever you need. Oh, get the FCC license you need first.

I won't comment on the difference between PCI and Rugged. I chose Rugged mostly due to availability and range of accessories. After the purchase I did find that I had paid an additional $100 for a TY-8600 radio. The additional cost can be thought of as the additional support and programming. The programming I blew away immediately and replaced with my own. This gave me access to channels and features that aren't available in many stock radios. Things like pre-programmed Weather Radio channels, or access to repeaters.

As for a clean install. I mounted mine in the cage, it did cost a bit more for the tube clamps ($60?). But it put everything out of the way, and put it where you could easily reach any controls. Best of all, the mud rarely gets that high... Rarely, but not always.
View attachment 121975

As for advice in an intercom, the only "advice" I would have is to avoid a VOX system. The reason I say that is again, simplicity.

I've been using intercoms and radios and intercoms professionally since I was 18, so 40 years between flying, flying for the Army and being a tank commander.

A VOX system has a built in delay when you you start speaking. So you either learn to start everything with a "leader" so that the VOX system is activated by the time you start speaking, or you lose the first part of the message. It gets really annoying.

I chose the Rugged Radios 5050 for the reason that its a constant on intercom, no activation lag.

All told I probably put $1k into intercoms and radios. At least $250 of that ended up in the trash at the end of the day.

Thanks
Nate
Thx for all the advice. Honestly I am thinking of going with The Com radio. They make an all in one kit that seems easy to mount overhead. It’s like $1200 plus headsets. Plus like yours being over head. Cleans stuff up. I really appreciate the insight.
 

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I got the super moto kits if you wanna be cheap about it. $500 for both. $250 ea. At Sand Show.... They are on sale for $250 right now black Friday.


Reason I went with that than a in car is because I can hear the radio outside my car with one walkie talkie and lend someone the other if their car has none...

It's a start. Works great, clear voice and sound, very loud, great noise blocking..
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Comms are important, get some kind of coms, period.

- as stated, if you register with the FCC you can get your own private channel frequency and then Rugged will program it to your radio.... Don't know exactly how much it is to do so.

-- in crowded areas radios can be a pain, you get a lot of interference and cross talk on channels.

- also a good thing if your in trouble lol. Glamis was pointless to use car to car, too much traffic.

- on rural trails having radios is great. Makes communication golden. No more hand signals or guessing what the other car is trying to communicate....
 
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